End Racism and Discrimination

End Racism and Discrimination (71)

A movement to change the name of a high school honoring Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart has gained support from Hollywood, including a pair of Oscar-winners, actress Julianne Moore and producer Bruce Cohen, who both attended the school in the 1970s.

At the start of the year, a group of 57 Native Americans students from the Lakota tribe were taken to a minor league hockey match in Rapid City, South Dakota to celebrate their academic achievements. But what started as a field trip to reward the students quickly turned into a nightmare, when a group of drunk men in an executive suite dumped beer on their heads and yelled “go back to the Rez!”

I was recently in Orlando, Florida, a few weeks after the brutal murder of nine African-American members of the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, for the annual Representative Assembly of the National Education Association (NEA), the union I am a retiree member of. Just 12 months earlier, the NEA, the nation’s largest labor union, made headlines when it elected three women of color to its executive leadership: President Lily Eskelsen Garcia, Vice President Becky Pringle and Treasurer Princess Moss. No other labor union in the United States could make that claim.

When the Confederate flag was removed from the South Carolina statehouse Friday morning, Gov. Nikki Haley spoke solemnly of the nine black churchgoers who were shot to death less than a month ago at Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.

The tiny town of Whiteclay, Nebraska sits outside the Pine Ridge Reservation. Boasting a population of 12, it exists only to sell alcohol to members of the Oglala Lakota Tribe where alcohol is prohibited. Each morning, 20 or more Lakota members wait for one of the four liquor stores to open, most after spending the night intoxicated and sleeping in the streets. The town sells approximately 5 million cans of beer annually.

The “Respond With Love” campaign was put together by three Muslim organizations to raise money for black churches that have burned in recent weeks.  

Early on Saturday morning a black activist took matters into her own hands by scaling the flagpole at South Carolina's Capitol in Columbia and taking down the Confederate flag by herself.  

The woman, Bree Newsome, 30, was about halfway up the more than 30-foot steel flagpole in front of the Statehouse just after dawn Saturday when State Capitol police told her to come down. Instead, she continued up and removed the flag before returning to the ground.

In Detroit, safety is a privilege enjoyed by the white and wealthy.

Some white people may be sitting on the sidelines out of discomfort over making faux pas – but they may need to get over that anxiety to help defeat injustice

A fire that engulfed a small, predominantly black church in Charlotte was set on purpose, local officials said Wednesday. Now they are trying to determine whether the act of arson was a hate crime.

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